Damaged bilateral relations between Turkey and the United States


The views expressed below are solely those of the author.

Charles Rault is Cyceon's Founder and Chief Analyst. "A Veteran in information analysis" according to US weekly Newsweek, Rault deals with data shared by a network of around 70 correspondents.

While the rapprochement between Turkey on the one hand, Russia and Iran on the other hand was formally established, the main ally of Ankara, namely the United States, found itself very concerned by accusations of supporting the failed coup. According to the spokesman of the Pentagon, these are unfounded and Turkey remains a “vital and extraordinary partner” in the region for many years, mainly against the Islamic State (ISIS).

The situation around the US military base of Incirlik remains unclear while the Turkish government maintains accusations that could eventually bring a heavy blow to NATO including the military offensive against ISIS which has not prevented the commission of terrorist attacks in Europe, especially in France. From a diplomatic standpoint, the US government is concerned about the “multiple open signals” sent by Ankara to Moscow – some claimed that Russia had informed the Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan of the imminent coup – and Tehran – where officials said diplomatic relations reached a 10-year high.

US analysts are seeking whether Erdogan’s gestures are to put pressure on the United States in order to have a free hand the time he deems necessary, or whether they reflect a profound change in the strategic posture and geopolitics of Turkey.

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